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September 3, 2001

Arts & Lectures lineup set for 2001-02

By John Newman

I know, I know. You've been pacing up and down all summer staring at those blank calendar pages and wondering what you're going to do for entertainment.

Texas newspaper columnist and best-selling author Molly Ivins will speak on November 9 as part of the Arts & Lectures series.
Once you've seen all the Shakespeare Santa Cruz productions, you're pretty much adrift in the horse latitudes. Even by Hollywood standards the summer movie crop has been a mind-boggling waste of working capital. I mean, do they really expect us to eat another American Pie after the psychological food poisoning we suffered from the first one? Bring back the old school studio moguls--at least they were willing to take a chance on something different now and then. The bottom-line suits rubber-stamping the puerile drivel that passes for a script these days are so bereft of creativity, they might as well put real, honest-to-God chimps behind the cameras. Wait a minute! I've got an idea. Let's make a movie out of a cheesy TV show that was canceled 25 years ago due to lack of interest.

Okay, okay, never mind. Your suffering (and mine) is nearly over. Finally, UCSC Arts & Lectures has released its 2001-02 calendar (just in time). So, limber up your phone-button punching finger and stand by. Here's the list (asterisks indicate a post-performance discussion with the artist or artists):

FALL 2001

Takács Quartet *
Saturday, October 20, 8 p.m.
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription Tickets: General $21; Senior/Student $17; UCSC student $12.

Called "four of the best string alchemists on the planet," by the Chicago Tribune, the Takács Quartet has appeared regularly in every major music capital and prestigious festival since its formation 26 years ago at Budapest's Liszt Academy. Their Santa Cruz performance will include Beethoven's String Quartet No. 10, Op. 74; Britten's String Quartet No. 3; and Brahms's String Quartet Op. 51, No. 2.

Awadagin Pratt *
Saturday, November 3, 8 p.m.
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription Tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription tickets: general $21; senior/student $17; UCSC student $12.

Among the new generation of concert pianists, Awadagin Pratt's musical insight and intensely involving performances have won him tremendous audience support. Named one of the 50 Leaders of Tomorrow by Ebony magazine, he is the winner of the Naumburg International Piano Competition and an Avery Fisher Career Grant. Pratt's Santa Cruz performance will include virtuoso works by Bach, Beethoven, and Lizst.

Molly Ivins
Friday, November 9, 8 p.m.
Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz

Non-subscription tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription tickets: general $21; senior/student $17; UCSC students $12.
Note: Non-subscription tickets for Molly Ivins will only be available through the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium Box Office (831-420-5260) after the Arts & Lectures early ticketing period has ended on September 15 (call the UCSC Ticket Office at 831-459-2159 before September 15 for details).

"Politics is great entertainment" says Molly Ivins, one of the nation's wittiest and best-known political pundits. Ivins, a widely syndicated political columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, is a three-time Pulitzer Prize finalist and author of the best-selling Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She, a collection of essays on politics and journalism. Her most recent book, Shrub: The Short but Happy Political Life of George W. Bush, was released in 2000. From the psychology of the entertainment industry to her experience as a young woman in the days when journalism was dominated by "good old boys," and women were relegated to covering "food, fluff and fashion," Ivins's point of view is fearless, humorous, and informative.


Glen Velez + Handance *
Sunday, November 11, 8 p.m.
Rio Theater, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, general seating

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

Grammy Award-winning frame drummer, composer, scholar, and teacher, Glen Velez has created his own musical style inspired by both Western percussion and frame drum styles from around the world. Called "one of the planet's most versatile percussionists" and "a captivating composer" by the Los Angeles Reader, Velez has brought a new genre of drumming into the Western music world by creating his own compositional style inspired by years of exploration into the drumming of various cultures.

The SITI Company *
"War of the Worlds"

Monday, December 3, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, December 4, 8 p.m.
Rio Theater, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, general seating

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription Tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

On a foggy evening in 1938, America went to war with Mars! At least that's what tens of thousands of radio listeners were convinced of when they tuned in late to a broadcast of H. G. Wells's War of the Worlds. For many listeners, normal programming appeared to have been interrupted with the startling news that "a huge flaming object" had fallen to Earth. Now, 64 years after its original broadcast, the awesome force of radio's single most famous broadcast is still burned on the collective mind of America. This classic radio play, performed as though on-air by the SITI Company, has maintained its ability to inspire in its audience a palpable sense of dread and expectant tension.


WINTER 2002

Arden Trio *
Friday, January 11, 8 p.m.
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

Performing with technical brilliance, an impressive command of style, and a remarkable blend of passion and delicacy, the Arden Trio has become one of the most important piano trios on the concert stage today. The trio's New York debut prompted Edward Rothstein of the New York Times to claim that the Arden seems to be "not a piano trio at all, but a single musical instrument, played with eminent virtuosity and sensitivity." For their Arts & Lectures performance, the trio will perform a new work written by Evan Ziporyn titled "Typical Music."

Urban Bush Women *
"Hair Stories"
Saturday, January 26, 8 p.m.
UCSC Theater Arts Mainstage

Non-subscription tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription tickets: general $21; senior/student $17; UCSC student $12.

The dynamic modern dance troupe Urban Bush Women weaves contemporary idioms with the folklore and spiritual traditions of African Americans to celebrate the struggle, transformation, and survival of the human spirit. Their evening-length work, "Hair Stories," explores the concept of hair in relation to images of beauty, social position, heritage, and self-esteem.

David Krakauer & Klezmer Madness *
Tuesday, February 5, 8 p.m.
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription tickets: general $21; senior/student $17; UCSC student $12.

The soulful sound of a clarinet connects the villages of 19th-century East European Jewry with the vital rhythms of contemporary klezmer. While honoring the traditional roots of klezmer music, David Krakauer and his quintet integrate elements of jazz, rock, and funk to make Klezmer Madness! one of the foremost ensembles of a booming klezmer revival. Known for his mastery of myriad styles including classical, Eastern European klezmer music, the avant-garde, rock, and jazz, internationally acclaimed clarinetist David Krakauer plays with tireless spirit, humor, and generosity.

Julianne Baird *
Friday, February 8, 8 p.m.
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

Soprano Julianne Baird has been hailed as one of the most extraordinary voices in the service of early music that this generation has produced. She possesses a natural musicianship which engenders singing of supreme expressive beauty. With nearly 100 recordings to her credit on Decca, Deutsche Gramophone, Newport Classics, and Dorian, Baird is considered one of America's most recorded women. Her newest program features songs of Shakespeare's time with Edward Mauger reading from Shakespeare's plays.

Smuin Ballets/SF *
Saturday, February 9, 8 p.m.
Sunday, February 10, 2 p.m.
Cabrillo College Theater, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos

Non-subscription tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription tickets: general $21; senior/student $17; UCSC student $12.

Known for his sexy, modern style and innovative common-man approach to the revered art of ballet, Smuin Ballets/SF founder and director Michael Smuin has attracted a loyal following. He has called his own lean and muscular innovations "guerrilla ballet," distinctive for his use of recorded music and borrowing from modern dance and jazz styles. The winner of seven Emmy Awards and a Tony Award, Smuin directed the San Francisco Ballet for 12 years and danced in and directed the American Ballet Theater before starting Smuin Ballets/SF in 1994.

The Marcus Roberts Trio
Saturday, February 16, 8 p.m.
(Pre-performance discussion with artist, 7:30 p.m.)
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

The spirit of jazz, from the past, present, and future, comes alive with Marcus Roberts. This acclaimed jazz pianist made his name as a key member of Wynton Marsalis's groups in the late '80s and early '90s. Since then, he has established himself as one of the ultimate musical traditionalists for his remarkable keyboard style and thorough perception of jazz as a dynamic influence in the evolution of American music.

Laurie Anderson
Sunday, March 10, 8 p.m.
Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz

Non-subscription tickets: general $30; senior/student $25; UCSC student $20.
Subscription Tickets: general $25; senior/student $21; UCSC student $17.
Note: Non-subscription tickets for Laurie Anderson will only be available through the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium Box Office (831-420-5260) after the Arts & Lectures early ticketing period has ended on September 15 (call the UCSC Ticket Office at 831-459-2159 before September 15 for details).

Laurie Anderson's legendary shows have earned her an international reputation as a high-tech magician of multimedia performance art. Once the enfant terrible of New York's avante-garde, Anderson, a self-described storyteller, has evolved into a kind of electronic folk artist daring to discuss thoughts and feelings that many rarely verbalize. A departure from her recent signature fusions of technology and art, Anderson's new solo work features stories and simple, mainly acoustic instruments. This performance, which will be one of the first presentations of her new work in the United States, examines contemporary culture through the filters of synthetic language, love songs, animal communication, and techno burnout.

Collective: Unconscious *
"Charlie, Victor, Romeo"
Tuesday, March 26, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, March 27, 8 p.m.
UCSC Theater Arts Mainstage

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

"Charlie, Victor, Romeo" is an award-winning dramatic work for the stage derived entirely from the "black box" cockpit voice recorder transcripts of six major airline emergencies. As audience members become privy to the tension-filled cockpit of real in-flight emergencies, this performance offers an eye-opening glimpse into decision-making and human interaction under what may be the most intense pressure imaginable. Called "a remarkable performance" by Flying Magazine and presented by request to groups ranging from health care and flying professionals to West Point students and the U.S. Air Force, "Charlie, Victor, Romeo" reveals remarkable portraits of courage, human frailty, and grace under fire.


SPRING 2002

Gyuto Monks
Wednesday, March 27, 8 p.m.
Thursday, March 28, 8 p.m.
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

After hearing the extraordinary multiphonic chanting of the Gyuto Monks in 1987, Grateful Dead percussionist Mickey Hart resolved to bring the monks to America and make them known to a wider audience. In addition to their own two recordings produced by Mickey Hart, the music of the Gyuto monks can be heard on the film soundtracks of Kundun and Seven Years in Tibet. The Tantric texts of Gyuto strive to cut away veils of illusion and transcend the everyday world of human folly, creating through prayer and spiritual dedication an ideal world of enlightenment and bliss. Don't miss this rare opportunity to see and hear this group on their special 2002 West Coast tour.


A Traveling Jewish Theatre *
"God's Donkey: A Play on Moses"
Saturday, April 6, 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 7, 3 p.m.
UCSC Theater Arts Mainstage

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

"God's Donkey: A Play on Moses" re-visions the story of Moses and questions the "conventional wisdom" that has, from this ensemble's perspective, encumbered the material for centuries. Looking at the story of Moses and the liberation of the Israelites from Egyptian bondage as a major turning point in human consciousness, the company examines the most basic assumptions of the "modern" word view--the existence of "history," national identity, individual choice, and the uniqueness of individual experience. Finding connections where others see division, this unique, artist-led ensemble digs into a variety of biblical translations and commentaries and presents for the audience a wealth of surprising and revelatory images.

Teatro Hugo & Ines *
"Short Stories"
Wednesday, April 10, 8 p.m.
Thursday, April 11, 8 p.m.
UCSC Theater Arts Mainstage

Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13.
Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

Transforming the ordinary into the extraordinary with amazing dexterity and delightful creativity, Teatro Hugo and Ines combines mime, dance, and puppetry to create a host of characters composed of knees, feet, hands and elbows. The Chicago Sun-Times sums up the genius of this wildly popular international duo from Peru--"It's simple enough to make audiences giggle. It takes art to make them believe." These wizards of hand trickery are a must-see for adults and children alike. "Not since Marcel Marceau in his heyday have I been so entranced by an evening of wordless wonderment"--Chicago Reader

Global African Music Festival
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

This festival brings together a variety of jazz and traditional music from regions within Africa and the U.S.

  • Friday, April 12, 9:30 p.m.: The Eddie Gale Quartet (trumpet, piano, bass, drums). Non-subscription tickets: general $18; senior/student $15; UCSC student $11. Subscription tickets: general $15; senior/student $13; UCSC student $9.

  • Saturday, April 13, 7 p.m.: Pre-concert lecture by Samite Mulondo: Music of Uganda. 8 p.m.: Samite Mulondo (electronically enhanced flute and mbira). 9:30 p.m.: Sam Rivers Trio (saxophones, flute, piano and drums/experimental and modern jazz). Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13. Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.

  • Sunday, April 14, 7 p.m.: Pre-concert lecture by Mamadou Diabate: Music of Mali. 8 p.m.: Mamadou Diabate solo performance (kora). 9:30 p.m.: Nelson Harrison (trombone) with Hesterian Musicism and guest Obo Addy (percussion) (experimental and modern jazz). Non-subscription tickets: general $23; senior/student $19; UCSC student $13. Subscription tickets: general $19; senior/student $16; UCSC student $11.


Doug Varone and Dancers *(discussion on Sunday only)
"Ballet Mecanique"
Sunday, April 14, 8 p.m.
Monday, April 15, 8 p.m.
UCSC Theater Arts Mainstage
Non-subscription tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription tickets: general $21; senior/student $17; UCSC student $12.

This new work of Doug Varone is set to the music of George Antheil's "Ballet Mécanique." In a dramatic rush of cinematic intensity, Varone lets loose a hailstorm of pyrotechnic choreography which defies gravity, punctuates every gesture of his superb ensemble of dancers, and turns this eternally contemporary music into an evening of trailblazing dance, shifting backdrops, frenetic rhythms, scenic projections, and impassioned physicality. "Doug Varone has produced some of modern dance's most engrossing works," and "he has a company of daredevils, profoundly human superhumans who dance on a dime--wheeling, darting, and slicing the air at lethal-looking speeds." --New York Times

Korean Musical Ceremony *
Wednesday, April 17, 8 p.m.
UCSC Music Center Recital Hall

Non-subscription tickets: general $18; senior/student $15; UCSC student $11.
Subscription tickets: general $15; senior/student $13; UCSC student $9.

Four of Korea's most valued and celebrated performers come together with four outstanding Western musicians to present an evening which travels from the honored traditions of Korean music to a dynamic contemporary performance drawing from the ritual ceremonies of Shamanism, Buddhism, and Christianity.

The concert introduces works from the Korean tradition, including dance and percussion performed by Eun-Ha Park, the first woman in Korean history to earn the respected title of Master Performer in her field. Park will perform with Korean National Treasure and Buddhist monk In-Muk, sharing his tradition of Korean Buddhist chanting; Korean National Treasure Chan-Sup Kim playing the piri (bamboo oboe); and virtuoso Eun-A Kwak playing her kayakeum (Korean zither).

Joining the four Korean musicians for the second half of the concert, a ceremony for lost friends, are William Winant, described by Mark Swed of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal as "one of the best avant-garde percussionists working today"; William Barbini, violinist and Concert Master of the Monterey Symphony; Jean-Michel Fonteneau, cellist and professor at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music; and John Sackett, clarinetist and lecturer in the music department at UC Santa Cruz. The combined ensemble will perform the premiere of "Rituel II," composed by UCSC professor of music Hi Kyung Kim. This new piece is a follow up to Kim's highly acclaimed "Rituel," which the San Francisco Examiner hailed as "a mesmerizing, thoroughly modern work whose trans-cultural timelessness deserves the widest possible audience."

Chanticleer *
Thursday, May 9, 8 p.m.
Friday, May 10, 8 p.m.
Holy Cross Church, 126 High St., Santa Cruz, general seating

Non-subscription tickets: general $25; senior/student $20; UCSC student $14.
Subscription tickets: general $21; senior/student $17; UCSC student $12.

Chanticleer has developed a remarkable reputation for its interpretation of vocal literature, from Renaissance to jazz, and from gospel to venturesome new music. With its seamless blend of 12 male voices, ranging from countertenor to bass, Chanticleer has earned international renown since its founding in 1978 as "an orchestra of voices." The San Francisco-based ensemble's 22 recordings include its Grammy-winning Colors of Love. Its most recent release, Magnificat, a disc of early music devoted to the Virgin Mary, climbed to the top 5 on the Billboard classical chart.

Subscribers to four or more shows receive at 15 percent discount. The Ticket Office, at the UCSC Theater Arts Center, is open Tuesday through Friday, from noon to 6 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call (831) 459-2159, check the web site or e-mail the Ticket Office.


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