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Merrill's American Indian colloquium begins January 20

Merrill College is hosting the fourth annual American Indian Colloquium Series this winter, offering three public lectures about Native American health. Admission is free, and the public is invited to attend.

This year's theme is “Native Health: Approaches, Services, & Issues.” Topics and guest speakers are described below. All presentations will take place from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in the Baobab Lounge at Merrill College. For more information or to accommodate special needs, call (831) 459-5836 or e-mail conleth@ucsc.edu.

Thursday, January 20
“Holistic System of Care”

  • Janet King (Lumbee), training coordinator, Native American Health Center in Oakland, and coauthor of “Urban Trails: A Holistic System of Care for Native Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area,” in Healing and Mental Health for Native Americans: Speaking in Red (AltaMira Press, 2004).
  • Solis Aguilera (Navajo, Chicano, and Miwok), youth services director, Family and Child Guidance Clinic, Native American Health Center in Oakland.

Tuesday, February 15
“Family Mental Health”

  • Sandra Beauchamp (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara), urban trails project director, Native American Health Center in Oakland, and author of “Mandan and Hidatsa Families and Children: Surviving Historical Assault,” in Healing and Mental Health for Native Americans: Speaking in Red.
  • Josephine McKay (Sierra Miwok and Dry-Creek Pomo), social worker, Family and Child Guidance Clinic, Native American Health Center in Oakland. McKay specializes in social work and counseling for youth.

Thursday, February 24
“Holistic HIV/AIDS Mental Health Services for Native Americans”

  • Nelson Jim (Dineh), clinical director for the Family and Child Guidance Clinic of the Native American Health Center in San Francisco. Jim has worked in the areas of HIV/AIDS, mental health, and substance abuse for more than 12 years. He oversees the Native Circle, a program funded through the Mental Health HIV/AIDS Services Collaborative Program of the federal Center for Mental Health Services. Jim is the author of “The Morning God Comes Dancing: Culturally Competent Mental Health and HIV Services,” in Healing and Mental Health for Native Americans: Speaking in Red.

“Healing the Kashaya Way”

  • Otis Parish (Kashaya), traditional healer and cultural attaché to the Phoebe Hearst Museum at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of “Healing the Kashaya Way,” in Healing and Mental Health for Native Americans: Speaking in Red.

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